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Linguistics (English Language)

How many hours per week?

Teaching contact time is 4 hours and 20 minutes per subject. Other workshops will be available throughout the year including over some holiday periods. Students are expected to complete up to 4 hours of independent study to complete assignments, homework, extra reading and independent research.

Entry Requirements

  • Grade 5 in GCSE English Language
  • Attainment 8 Score: 47

Under review for 2019/20 entry

 

Exam Board

OCR Apply for this course

Pathways

Course Overview

Linguistics (English Language) is very different from what you will have studied before at school. It involves examining every aspect of our language in great detail, and understanding how this is shaped by other factors- for example our age, gender and position in society. You will study how our language is put together, and how this has developed over time, as well as understanding how children learn to speak and responding to experts’ views on why this happens. You have to read and respond to a range of texts from different eras and viewpoints, and use your knowledge of theory, and the make-up of the language, to comment on what they are trying to achieve. It works well alongside studying foreign languages, as well as Psychology and Sociology. It is also a good companion to English Literature, and is recommended for anyone considering a degree in the subject, as many English Literature degrees involve a unit of Linguistics.

If you choose this course you would benefit from:
•Experienced teachers who specialise Linguistics teaching
•Guest lecturers from Redbrick universities.
•Trips to London to visit the British Library and trips to universities to see how English Language is taught at higher education institutions.
•A chance to investigate a language issue that you find interesting, with the guidance of teaching staff.

What will I learn?

In the first year you will study:

  • Grammar terminology
  • How to analyse lexical choices
  • How context can affect language choices
  • Language and Gender
  • Language and Power
  • Language and Technology

In the second year you will study:

  • Child language acquisition
  • How to undertake a research project on a language issue of your choice
  • How to create an academic poster
  • Phonology
  • How the context of a written text can contribute to language change
  • How and why linguistic changes occur over time

What will I be taught?

This course is taught through lessons where students will be expected to contribute and deliver material to other students. Some areas, such as grammar terminology, will be taught through flipped learning where students will be expected to access teaching resources from the college Moodle before the topic will be reviewed in class. In addition, your teacher and personal tutor will review and discuss your progress with you and will be available for advice to support your learning.

Classroom activities will include:

  • Class discussions on language issues
  • Essay based assessments
  • Interactive online quizzes
  • group work
  • student led sessions

Where will this course take me?

As part of a wider programme, this course provides an excellent basis for progression to many careers or university courses.
Former students of this college have gone on to study modern foreign languages, English language, English literature, teaching, law, and others.

How will I be assessed?

80% exam

  • Exploring Language
  • Dimensions of Linguistic Variation

20% Coursework- Independent language research

  • Independent language investigation
  • Academic Poster

Staff Contact Details

Caroline Chattaway caroline.chattaway@kecnuneaton.ac.uk

Natalie Murphy natalie.murphy@kecnuneaton.ac.uk

Paul Maiden paul.maiden@kecnuneaton.ac.uk