History

How many hours per week?

Teaching contact time is 4 hours and 20 minutes per subject plus at least 4 hours of independent study. In the second year this will increase when working on coursework. Additional support workshops run through most of the year.

Entry Requirements

  • Grade 5 in GCSE English Language
  • Grade 5 or above in History or relevant subject
  • Attainment 8 Score: 50

Exam Board

OCR
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Pathways

Course Overview

History is for students who have a genuine curiosity about different periods of history including some familiar topics, and some new stories you will discover for the first time. It suits students who enjoy a good debate, and want to develop academic reading, writing and speaking skills.

If you choose this course you would benefit from:

  • Teachers who are all educated to postgraduate level and a team with extensive exam marking experience
  • Pick your own coursework topic
  • Free talks from university academics via the Historical Association as well as opportunities to enter debating and essay competitions
  • Trips and visits to museums, revision lecture days and overseas excursions

What will I learn?

In the first year you will study:

  • Unit 2: The Crusades and Crusader States 1095-1192
    • The causes, course and consequences of the first three crusades
    • The impact of the crusades on the Levant and the Muslim response
    • The rise and fall of the Crusader Kingdom in Jerusalem
  • Unit 1: The Early Tudors and the Mid Tudor Crisis 1485-1558
    • Henry VII
    • Henry VIII and his advisers Wolsey and Cromwell including the religious reformations in England
    • Primary sources exam question: The Stability of the monarchy 1547-1558 including economic, social and religious unrest in the reigns of Edward VI and Mary I

In the second year you will study:

  • Coursework topic of your choice (20%)
  • Unit 3: Russia and its rulers 1855-1964
    • Political, economic and social change in Russia
    • The impact of War and Revolution on Russia
    • The nationalities of the Russian Empire
    • Historical interpretations on Alexander IIs reforms, The Provisional Government and Khrushchev in power

What will I be taught?

Why did Henry VIII divorce Catherine of Aragon? How was Lenin able to seize power in October 1917? Does Richard I deserve his reputation as a great military leader? History is a never ending debate. History lessons involve research, discussion, debate, teacher-led and student-led presentations to help you make your own supported arguments on some of the biggest turning points of the last 1000 years. You will have homework tasks to complete using Moodle to prepare for each lesson. Our well stocked library will help you to continue your reading independently to boost your grades and prepare you for university.

Classroom activities will include:

  • Class debate and group discussion
  • Analysing primary sources and evaluating historians’ interpretations.
  • Quizzes in different formats to help you learn the detail
  • Research tasks individually and in groups with student led presentations
  • Timed essays and skills focus lessons

Where will this course take me?

Because history develops strong skills in argument, persuasion and use of evidence, many historians follow careers in Law. Teaching, civil service and politics, journalism and business are also popular career paths. Former students now study degrees including Law, History, Politics and English at universities such as Warwick, Durham, Oxford, Birmingham and Kings College London.

How will I be assessed?

Coursework 20%

Three exams:

  • Early Tudors and the Mid-Tudor Crisis 1485-1558 25%
  • Crusades and Crusader States 1095-1192 15%
  • Russia and its rulers 1855-1964 40%

Staff Contact Details

Ruth Leger ruth.leger@kecnuneaton.ac.uk

Elizabeth Smith elizabeth.smith@kecnuneaton.ac.uk